Services 2018-09-13T02:28:17+00:00

Routine & Preventive Care

beautiful girl hugging a dog in the park
Regular screening can allow us to find diseases before symptoms are obvious. If we find a disease early, we have better success in treating the disease or may be able to slow the time until symptoms do show. Lab tests, x-rays, and ultrasound screenings can help detect potential problem areas such as:

We provide routine preventative wellness care such as yearly exams, vaccinations, heartworm testing, and:

  • Regular physical and dental examinations
  • Vaccinations as necessary
  • Parasite control
  • Feline Leukemia and Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) testing
  • Spay/Neuter surgery
  • Dental examinations and cleanings
  • Microchip placement
  • Nutrition counseling
  • Obesity screening
Regular screening can allow us to find diseases before symptoms are obvious. If we find a disease early, we have better success in treating the disease or may be able to slow the time until symptoms do show. Lab tests, x-rays, and ultrasound screenings can help detect potential problem areas such as:

  • Kidney disease
  • Liver disease
  • Diabetes
  • Heart disease
  • Thyroid disease
  • Periodontal disease
Wellness care is particularly important in senior and geriatric pets!

Anesthesia & Surgery

Close up face of siamese adult cat
Anesthesia, Surgery, and Pain Control
Several of our staff doctors perform surgeries from routine to very complicated.  Dr. Chris Glawe performs many of the orthopedic surgeries and more complicated soft tissue surgeries.  Dr. Melani PoundstoneDr. Melissa Etheridge, Dr. Christina Suhr, Dr. Sylvia Berns, and Dr. Rachel Lauria perform laparoscopic and soft tissue surgeries.

Our staff uses the most state of the art medication and equipment in anesthesia available today.

Our surgical patients routinely receive regional (epidural and incisional blocks) and intra-operative pain medication to allow delivery of less anesthesia and improved recovery.

We provide a wide range of surgical services in the areas of soft tissue (spay/neuter, abdominal), orthopedics, arthroscopic, dental extractions, CO2 laser and cryosurgery.

Your pet’s comfort and safety is our priority!


Isn’t anesthesia dangerous?

Although anesthesia always carries a degree of risk, the modern anesthetics in use in our hospital minimize this risk, even for older pets. To further ensure safety:

  • All anesthesia patients have an exam and pre-surgical blood work before anesthesia.
  • We do full anesthesia and recovery monitoring, using state-of-the-art equipment.
  • An IV catheter is placed to give fluids, to support blood pressure, and to administer pain medication.
  • We use Engler respirators to maintain appropriate respiratory rate and make sure lungs are well ventilated.
  • We maintain body temperature with specialized warm air blankets.
  • We use minimally invasive techniques whenever possible.

What is a minimally invasive surgery?



Minimally invasive means minimal disruption of surrounding tissues and organs, minimizing patient discomfort after surgery. Examples include:

  • Laparoscopic abdominal surgery—including spay, bladder stone removal, liver biopsies, and stomach tacking to prevent bloat.
  • Arthroscopic joint surgery (arthroscopy)
  • Video Otoscopy (ear exam and cleaning)
We believe that all surgical patients experience pain. That is why all of our surgical patients are treated before, during, and after their surgery with pain medication.

  • Pain control is customized for your pet’s procedure and health status.
  • We use epidural pain control when needed, such as during orthopedic surgery.

What type of scheduling is needed for surgery?

We ask that you schedule the procedure a few days in advance.

It will be necessary to withhold food after 8:00 P.M. the night before; please do not remove the water.

Your pet will be admitted to the hospital between 7:00 A.M. and 7:30 A.M. and will generally be ready for discharge in the late afternoon.

Laparoscopic Spay


What is the difference between laparoscopic and traditional spay?

In a laparoscopic procedure, we place two small holes through skin and abdomen which allow for the insertion of a fiberoptic camera. These holes depend on the size of your pet but are often 3-10mm (roughly 1/8-1/2 inch). The reproductive structures are identified and controlled cuts in the tissues are made.

In a traditional spay, a 2-3 inch incision is made in the skin and muscle just below the belly button. The ovarian ligament is torn from its attachment on the abdominal wall. This tearing causes pain and may result in bruising of the abdominal wall.

Why laparoscopic?

  • The small incision size minimizes tissue trauma and pain.
  • Tissue is removed without tearing, minimizing pain.
  • Better visualization of surgical procedure, minimizing complications.
  • No increase in surgical time compared to traditional procedures.
  • Your pet is back to normal much more quickly.

Is this a standard procedure?

Hampden Family Pet Hospital is very proud to be one of the first hospitals in the country to offer laparoscopic spays to our clients. The late Dr. Ty Tankersley, one of the founders of our clinic, helped pioneer the laparoscopic ovariectomy techniques currently used. Dr. Tankersley made instructional videos, developed equipment, lectured and taught the technique to veterinarians around the world. In addition, our spays incorporate just the removal of the ovaries (ovariectomy) and not the full uterus (hysterectomy).

What is an ovariectomy?

The term ovariectomy means to remove only the ovaries. By removing only the ovaries, there is minimal disruption to surrounding tissues and organ, minimizing patient discomfort after surgery.

  • Less tissue removed means less trauma.
  • May reduce the incidence of urinary incontinence later in life.

Is spaying the only surgery done laparoscopically?

Laparoscopic surgery can be done for many abdominal procedures including bladder stone removal, liver biopsies and stomach tacking to prevent bloat (gastropexy).

Arthroscopic joint surgery

What is arthroscopy?



Arthroscopy is the evaluation of a joint using a specialized camera to look inside a joint to diagnose and treat problems.

  • In an arthroscopic examination, an orthopedic surgeon makes a small incision in the patient’s skin and then inserts pencil-sized instruments that contain a lighting system and a small lens to magnify the joint structures.
  • Magnification allows the surgeon to see problems that are not visible to the naked eye. The lens on the end of the arthroscope is like a miniature television camera. The picture from the arthroscope is shown on a television screen in the operating room.
  • The surgeon is able to see the inside of the joint through this very small incision rather than a large incision needed for traditional surgery.
The surgeon can determine the amount or type of injury and correct the problem, if it is necessary.  

CO2 Laser Surgery

What are the benefits of laser surgery?

  • Less bleeding — the laser seals small blood vessels during surgery and speeds up surgery by minimizing bleeding.
  • Less swelling — no physical contact except the invisible laser beam. The tissue will not be crushed.
  • Sterilization—the laser sterilizes the surgical site as it cuts. Bacteria and viruses are vaporized by the laser during laser surgery.
  • Precision—the beam direction and power can be controlled precisely to remove thin layers of tissue and produce minimal side effects on the surrounding healthy tissue.

What is laser?

A laser system supplies highly focused and powerful beam of infrared light that can selectively interact with tissue.

How does laser work?

Our CO2 surgical laser system uses controlled pulses of light to precisely destroy, cut, or remove target tissue by vaporizing tissue.

Digital X-ray

Black dog in front of a meadow
Hampden Family Pet Hospital uses digital x-ray (including dental x-ray) because it is more efficient than traditional x-rays, minimizes anesthesia, and provides for enhancement of images:

  • We have a board certified radiologist review and interpret all of our x-rays
  • Increases patient comfort because it takes less time—no waiting for film to develop
  • Reduces exposure to radiation
  • Environmentally friendly (no x-ray film or chemicals are used)

Ultrasound

kitten hunting a butterfly with Back Lit
We have a complete radiology unit and employ a Board Certified Radiologist to view films and perform diagnostic ultrasound when needed for your pet.

Ultrasound is a handheld instrument used to pass sound waves through the body. A computer analyzes the sound reflected back from structures inside the body and converts this information into a picture. We have a complete radiology unit and employ a Board Certified Radiologist to view films and perform diagnostic ultrasound when needed for your pet. Scans are routinely conducted on the heart, kidneys, liver, urinary bladder, and gallbladder. Ultrasound is often used to guide procedures such as fine needle aspiration (FNA) for biopsy testing. We schedule ultrasound examinations twice weekly but alternative arrangements are routinely made in case of emergency.

Dr. Jennifer Grimm received her DVM degree from the University of Illinois in 1998. After a year in small animal practice, she returned to the University of Illinois to complete a 3 year residency in radiology. Dr. Grimm is board certified in veterinary radiology and is a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Radiology. After working as an associate professor in radiology at the University of Illinois for two years, she moved to Colorado to work for Diagnostic Imaging, P.C. She shares her home with her husband, also a veterinarian, three dogs and three cats.

In-House Diagnostic Laboratory

Red Blood Cells
We have a complete on-site lab facility which includes complete blood counts, chemistry profiles, electrolytes, urinalysis, fecal exams, and other tests for accurate and quick results.

We also utilize a send-out lab for more in-depth chemistry profiles and specialty testing such as biopsy, allergy testing, bladder stone analysis and rabies titers.





CO2 Laser Surgery

Abstract red laser beam
Our CO2 surgical laser system uses controlled pulses of light to precisely destroy, cut, or remove target tissue by vaporizing tissue.

What are the benefits of laser surgery?

  • Less bleeding – the laser seals small blood vessels during surgery and speeds up surgery by minimizing bleeding.
  • Less swelling – no physical contact except the invisible laser beam. The tissue will not be crushed.
  • Sterilization – the laser sterilizes the surgical site as it cuts. Bacteria and viruses are vaporized by the laser during laser surgery.
  • Precision – the beam direction and power can be controlled precisely to remove thin layers of tissue and produce minimal side effects on the surrounding healthy tissue.

What is laser?

A laser system supplies highly focused and powerful beam of infrared light that can selectively interact with tissue.

How does laser work?

Our CO2 surgical laser system uses controlled pulses of light to precisely destroy, cut, or remove target tissue by vaporizing tissue.

Spay & Neuter

Cute little ginger kitten is sleeping in soft blanket on wooden floor
We use the same state of the art monitoring and anesthesia as we do for other major surgeries to ensure optimum safety. We perform laparoscopic spay procedures.

Spaying and Neutering

What is the difference between laparoscopic and traditional spay?

In a laparoscopic procedure, we place two small holes through skin and abdomen which allow for the insertion of a fiberoptic camera. These holes depend on the size of your pet but are often 3-10mm (roughly 1/8-1/2 inch). The reproductive structures are identified and controlled cuts in the tissues are made.

In a traditional spay, a 2-3 inch incision is made in the skin and muscle just below the belly button. The ovarian ligament is torn from its attachment on the abdominal wall. This tearing causes pain and may result in bruising of the abdominal wall.

Why laparoscopic?

  • The small incision size minimizes tissue trauma and pain.
  • Tissue is removed without tearing, minimizing pain.
  • Better visualization of surgical procedure, minimizing complications.
  • No increase in surgical time compared to traditional procedures.
  • Your pet is back to normal much more quickly.

Is this a standard procedure?

Hampden Family Pet Hospital is very proud to be one of the first hospitals in the country to offer laparoscopic spays to our clients. The late Dr. Ty Tankersley, one of the founders of our clinic, helped pioneer the laparoscopic ovariectomy techniques currently used. Dr. Tankersley made instructional videos, developed equipment, lectured and taught the technique to veterinarians around the world. In addition, our spays incorporate just the removal of the ovaries (ovariectomy) and not the full uterus (hysterectomy).

What is an ovariectomy?

The term ovariectomy means to remove only the ovaries. By removing only the ovaries, there is minimal disruption to surrounding tissues and organ, minimizing patient discomfort after surgery.

  • Less tissue removed means less trauma.
  • May reduce the incidence of urinary incontinence later in life.

Is spaying the only surgery done laparoscopically?

Laparoscopic surgery can be done for many abdominal procedures including bladder stone removal, liver biopsies and stomach tacking to prevent bloat (gastropexy).

Acupuncture

Animal acupuncture closeup
Acupuncture has been proven to increase endorphins (the body’s natural analgesia and pain relievers), boost the immune system, increase blood circulation to the areas needed, relieve muscle spasms, and stimulate nerves.

Dr. Suhr have received extensive training and certification in Veterinary Acupuncture. They are the only veterinarians who perform this specialized treatment at Hampden Family Pet Hospital. Acupuncture has been proven to increase endorphins (the body’s natural analgesia and pain relievers), boost the immune system, increase blood circulation to the areas needed, relieve muscle spasms, and stimulate nerves. Many animals become relaxed or will even sleep during the treatment session.



What is acupuncture?

  • Acupuncture is the insertion of fine needles into specific points on the body to correlate with a desired healing effect.
There are different acupuncture techniques: Manual or dry needling is the most common, where needles are inserted for 10-30 minutes. Electropuncture is the process of hooking electrodes to some of the inserted needles to pass low levels of electrical energy through acupuncture points. This is not painful and produces a mild tingling sensation under the skin. Other techniques include aquapuncture, where small amounts of saline or vitamins are injected into a site or moxibustion which involves warming the needle.

How does acupuncture work?

  • On average, 65-85% of animals will show moderate to marked improvement with treatments.
Acupuncture has been proven to increase endorphins (the body’s natural analgesia and pain relievers), boost the immune system, increase blood circulation to the areas needed, relieve muscle spasms, and stimulate nerves. According to Traditional Chinese Medicine, disease is the result of an imbalance of energy in the body. Specific acupuncture points will help redirect the body’s energy (chi) back into harmony. In western medical terms, acupuncture assists the body by causing physiologic changes.

What are some of the uses of acupuncture?

Acupuncture can have an effect on a variety of illnesses. It is often used in conjunction with Western medicine and surgical treatment. The most common conditions where veterinary acupuncture is used include:

  • Musculoskeletal disorders (arthritis, back pain).
  • Neurological disorders
  • Gastrointestinal disorders
  • Respiratory disorders

Is acupuncture painful?

  • Many animals become relaxed or will even sleep during treatment sessions.
Most pets are very tolerant of the needles. Because acupuncture needles are much smaller than needles used for vaccinations and injections, needle insertion is usually painless. It is important for owners to relax during treatments because pets are very sensitive to their owner’s anxieties.

How long do acupuncture treatments last, and how often are they needed?

  • The length and frequency of treatments depends on the problem and condition of your pet.
Effectiveness of acupuncture will vary depending on the disease and the individual pet. Initially we recommend 4-6 treatments about one week apart. If the problem is acute (occurring suddenly), such as back pain, we may not need to do any follow-up visit. If the disease is chronic, such as arthritis, treatments may be needed for 1-4 months. We are usually able to see improvement by the 4th or 5th treatment.

Are all veterinarians qualified to do acupuncture?

  • No, acupuncture is not usually part of veterinary school training.
A vet who wants to become certfied in acupuncture takes a 5-month course after vet school. After this course, certification is completed by passing written and practical exams, writing a scientific paper, and completing externship hours.

Dentistry

cat yawning
Find out what is involved in a teeth cleaning, better practices for teeth care, and other dental information.

Why should I brush my pet’s teeth?

Plaque is continually forming on your pet’s teeth. Plaque is an accumulation of bacteria that forms at the gum line. When plaque is not removed daily with tooth brushing, calculus then forms irritating the gums further and causing infection. This infection then spreads under the gum line causing destruction of the attachments that hold the teeth in place. In addition to creating loose teeth, infection under the gum line can spread to the kidney, liver and heart. Daily removal of plaque is the key to an effective oral hygiene program.

How often does my pet need to have its teeth cleaned by the veterinarian?


It depends on the degree of plaque and tartar accumulation. You can perform regular oral exams on your pet. If you see an accumulation of yellow or brown material at the area where the tooth meets the gum line or if the gum line appears red above the tooth, it is time for a professional teeth cleaning.

Can I just remove the calculus myself with my fingernail or dental scaler?

Removing the calculus from the visible part of the tooth does not treat the problem that is occurring below the gum line. It is the plaque and calculus build up under the gum line that causes periodontal disease.

Do you have to use anesthetics to clean my pet’s teeth?

Anesthesia is necessary when performing teeth cleaning. Anesthesia provides six important functions:
  1. Immobilization in order to clean below the gum line
  2. Pain control
  3. Placement of an endo-tracheal tube to prevent calculus and other debris from entering the respiratory system and to maintain an airway
  4. Thorough evaluation of tooth roots with dental x-rays
  5. Evaluation of pocket depths around each tooth
  6. Ability to treat or extract diseased teeth

What is involved in a routine teeth cleaning at your hospital?


  1. A physical exam is performed prior to placing your pet under anesthesia.
  2. Preoperative blood work is performed and evaluated.
  3. An intravenous catheter is placed to give fluids and any necessary drugs during the procedure.
  4. Your pet is placed under a general anesthetic and their heart rate, heart rhythm (ECG), blood pressure, body temperature and SpO2 (percentage of oxygen saturation in blood) are monitored during the entire procedure by a certified veterinary technician. Your pet is also placed under a forced air warming blanket.
  5. Your pet’s teeth are then hand scaled and ultrasonically cleaned above and below the gum line.
  6. Radiographs of your pet’s teeth are then taken.
  7. Your pet’s teeth are then charted and pocket depths are measured for each tooth.
  8. Your pet’s teeth are then polished to remove small scratches on the surface of the tooth.
  9. A veterinarian then evaluates the radiographs and performs an oral exam. Checking for fractured teeth, discolored teeth, wear patterns of the teeth and oral cancer.
  10. Your pet is then recovered from the anesthesia by a veterinary technician.

What if you find loose teeth or an infected tooth?

Teeth that are loose have bone loss that has occurred underneath the gum line. If the bone loss is greater than 50% we would extract the tooth. Bone loss less than 50% can be treated by root planning and application of an antibiotic material to try to get the gum to adhere back to the tooth.

If a tooth is found to have a root tip infection — surgical extraction is our only option.

If a tooth is fractured but the pulp cavity is not exposed, the tooth can be sealed.

If a tooth is fractured and the pulp cavity is exposed but the root itself looks fine, there are two options, extract the tooth or perform a root canal.

We employ a board certified veterinary dentist to perform specialized endodontic procedures.

What is involved with extractions and what is the cost?

It is difficult to give an exact estimate for extractions. The cost is dependent upon the time it takes to extract the tooth and the number of teeth extracted. If your pet needs an extraction, a local anesthetic will be instilled, a gingival flap will be made, and the bone surrounding the roots will be removed. The tooth will then be split and elevated out of the socket. This method helps prevent excessive trauma to the jaw during the extraction. The flap is then sutured closed to prevent food from accumulating in the socket and improve patient comfort.

What is periodontal disease?

Teeth are anchored in periodontal tissues consisting of gingival (gums), ligaments, cementum and supporting bone. Periodontal disease starts with the formation of plaque. Plaque starts forming within twelve hours after a thorough dental cleaning. When plaque is not removed, mineral salts in the saliva hasten the formation of hard calculus. Calculus, covered with bacteria, is irritating to the gums. By-products of bacteria destroy the tooth support structures, causing pain and periodontal disease. More than 85% of dogs and cats over the age of four years have periodontal disease.

Periodontal disease can be graded in four stages. The first two stages are classified as gingivitis and the last two as periodontitis. Thorough dental cleaning followed by home care, can usually reverse the first two stages. If the first two stages are left untreated, periodontitis can result. Periodontal disease occurs when there is bone loss in addition to gingival inflammation and infection. Once bone loss has occurred, more involved therapy than teeth cleaning is needed. Factors to be considered before periodontal surgery are: do you have a cooperative patient, is the tooth treatable, and which procedure would best benefit the tooth and patient.

The owner of a dog or cat with periodontal disease needs to be committed to saving the animal’s teeth. This commitment includes daily brushing to remove plaque. Frequent veterinary dental examinations are also required, therefore expense should be considered.

The patient must also be a willing partner. If a dog or cat will not allow home care, it is wiser to extract a tooth rather than letting the pet suffer with dental pain.

Oncology

miniature schnauzer dog running in summer
The diagnosis of cancer in a companion animal can be devastating. Few words evoke such depth and variety of emotion as the word cancer. Fortunately, there are currently many options for treatment of the various forms of malignancies found in dogs and cats

Cancer Topics
  1.  Symptoms
  2.  Diagnosis
  3.  Cancer Treatment
  4.  Cancer Survivorship
Recognizing Cancer Symptoms In Your Pet

Unfortunately many types of cancer do not display obvious symptoms or cause discomfort in pets until well advanced. Early warning signs tend to be subtle, such as weight loss, and can be mistaken for other more common problems in aging animals.

The Major Warning Signs of Cancer in Companion Animals:


  •  Skin lumps or sores that do not heal
  •  Changes in appetite, urination or bowel habits
  •  Unusual bleeding or discharge
  •  Persistent cough or difficulty swallowing food or water
  •  Foul breath
  •  Lameness that does not respond to medication
Some symptoms are specific to certain types of cancer, such as lameness seen with bone cancer.   Diagnostic tests are available for most common cancers.  If diagnosed early, chances of successful treatment are greatly increased.

Diagnosis of Cancer in Companion Animals

Early detection of a cancer before it is able to progress is challenging in veterinary patients.  There are however wonderful tools available for determining the diagnosis and “staging” of the cancer (determines the extent of cancer in the rest of the body).  Common diagnostic tests for veterinary cancer patients include:

Cytology:  A small sample of fluid is removed and the cells are evaluated microscopically for characteristics commonly associated with cancer.  This is a less invasive method of cancer detection.

Biopsy:  A small sample of tissue from the lesion is surgically removed and evaluated under a microscope.  This usually provides the most definite answer regarding the type of cancer present.

Diagnostic Imaging:

X-rays, ultrasound, MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), CT scan (computerized axial tomography) and nuclear scintigraphy (eg bone scan) are techniques used to obtain images of the organs inside of the body.  These methods are used to define the local extent of the cancer and search for groups of cells that may have migrated to other areas (metastases).

Blood and Urine Analysis:  Evaluation of an animal’s metabolic function, cell counts and urine characteristics can be helpful to detect cancer in some cases.  Mostly these tests provide information regarding the overall health status of an animal and help determine what types of treatment are reasonable to consider.

Cancer Treatment: The Options

There are several types of treatment utilized for cancer in dogs and cats.  Recommended treatments vary according to the type of tumor, the patient’s current condition and the owners’ preferences regarding treatment.  The major types of therapy include:

Surgery: The oldest form of cancer treatment.  Generally is the most successful treatment for many types of neoplasia.

Chemotherapy: “Chemotherapy” means drug therapy.  In an oncologic sense, this can be used to kill cancer cells, delay their growth or relieve pain symptoms.  There are many different drugs utilized for these purposes and they may be given singularly or in combination. These medications can be administered as an injection, as an infusion (an intravenous drip over several minutes) or as an oral medication at home.

Radiation therapy:  This is a targeted local treatment where high energy beams are used to destroy cancerous cells. In veterinary medicine, there are few centers which provide radiation therapy, however this modality is available in Colorado. Veterinary patients generally must be anesthetized for each treatment so as to minimize damage to surrounding normal tissue while the energy is delivered appropriately.

Immunotherapy: These are treatments that use the patient’s own natural defenses to fight cancer.  In veterinary medicine, this is a relatively new field of cancer treatment.  The most recently developed successful immunotherapy is a vaccine for  canine melanoma patients.

Angiogenesis Inhibitors:  In order for cancer to grow in the body, a blood supply is needed.  Some cancers are very effective in forming their own blood vessels to sustain growth.  Angiogenesis inhibition is a relatively new modality of treatment that stops this process and therefore delays growth of new cancer cells.

Palliative Care:  The goal of palliative care is to prevent and relieve the suffering of cancer patients.  This type of therapy is often thought of as “end  of life” treatment, or when other types of therapy have failed. In fact, this type of therapy is supportive care during the entire course of the patient’s definitive treatments (such as surgery or chemotherapy) that ensures the best quality of life.  If the patient’s cancer cannot be treated, then the focus of palliative care shifts to  pain control and discernment of appropriate time for humane euthanasia.

Cancer Survivorship Early recognition, improved treatments and successful supportive care of veterinary cancer patients has helped achieve the goal of improved quality of life in many cases.   Cure is not always feasible in our patients, however long term remission (control) of the cancer is certainly possible in several instances.   Each patient’s condition is unique and we will discuss the realistic possibilities of treatment and anticipated outcome with each option.  Ultimately, the short and long term impact of cancer upon a companion animal and your family is critical to understand.

Common Cancer Types  (see handouts:  Resources:  Pet Health Library) Cancer Treatments:

Dermatology

Stray flea itch cute cat use paw scratch its body on wooden table.
Rocky Mountain Veterinary Dermatology is the compassionate, affordable, expert choice for for your pet’s allergy, skin or ear problem. Dr. Strauss is a board certified veterinary dermatologist committed to offering state of the art care and customized treatment plans for any dermatological problem. We work with your family veterinarian to diagnose and effectively treat your pet’s skin problem.

Dr. Strauss emphasizes specific allergy testing and long term treatment plans designed to keep your pet happy. We also diagnose and treat ear diseases, skin infections and autoimmune skin diseases. Come and see the difference a specialist can make in the quality of your pet’s life.

Cardiology

A large group of dogs Golden retrievers running in the summer through the green valley
Occasionally, dogs and cats experience heart and lung related symptoms that require an expert familiar with these conditions. Whether it is to evaluate a heart murmur, rhythm disturbance, or congenital cardiovascular defect, Dr. Carrie Ginieczki, board certified cardiologist, is available to provide our patients with a thorough cardiac evaluation. An echocardiogram (ultrasound of the heart) and electrocardiogram (ECG) are non-painful tests routinely performed within our hospital. The information these tests provide is important in determining the severity of the heart condition and formulating an effective treatment strategy.

Class IV Laser Therapy

Dog
Class IV Laser therapy uses electromagnetic energy to direct an intense beam of laser light into tissues to reduce pain, decrease inflammation and accelerate healing time.

Class IV Laser application has many uses. Just a few include: arthritis, ligament injuries, sprains, open wounds, back pain, and nerve damage.

Dogs and cats are very comfortable with laser treatments, which only take a few minutes to administer by a veterinarian or technician. Several laser treatments are usually needed to help with the problem. Call us for more information about our laser therapy. (303) 761-7063.

Overnight Nursing Care

Labrador dog outdoors
We employ a certified veterinary technician to care for sick, injured, and post-operative patients twenty-four hours a day Monday-Friday. This service enables our staff to provide hospitalized patients with personalized attention and care, intravenous fluid therapy, continuous pain medication when needed, and monitoring of vital signs.



Urgent care

Cat portrait
Hampden Family Pet Hospital is open until 8pm on weekday nights. Although we see emergencies throughout the day, we recognize that many critical situations occur with pets after regular business hours. Our hospital has a full staff until 8pm on weekday nights which allows us to provide emergency treatment for conditions such as lacerations, vomiting/diarrhea, dehydration, bloat, etc… In addition, we have the ability to hospitalize sick and injured patients overnight under 24 hour observation by one of our certified veterinary technicians. We also recognize that many clients need extended office hours due to their demanding work schedules. We can accommodate our clients by also scheduling routine office call appointments until 8pm.

Our clients are relieved to know that if their pet experiences an emergency beyond regular business hours, Hampden Family Pet Hospital still has an open door.